Swedish Coronavirus Commission says Government was Correct to Keep Primary and Lower Secondary Schools Open

Anthony LaMesa
3 min readFeb 25, 2022

Commission declares “right balance was struck”

Sweden’s Coronavirus Commission — established in June 2020 to assess the government’s pandemic response — has declared that the government was correct to keep primary and lower secondary schools open throughout the pandemic and guarantee students access to important teaching.

“Preschools and compulsory (primary and lower secondary) schools have been able to remain open, and children in the age groups concerned have received the teaching they need to prepare them for the future.”

Unlike most other countries in Europe and throughout the world, Sweden never closed primary and lower secondary schools in spring 2020.

According to the commission, “the right balance was struck” by keeping primary and lower secondary schools open — schools serving children up to age 16 — and temporarily switching to virtual instruction at upper secondary schools and universities.

The Commission is of the opinion that the right balance was struck in keeping preschools and compulsory schools open and switching to distance learning at upper secondary schools and universities.

Swedish Coronavirus Commission Report English Summary

The commission’s report highlights that the Swedish government “was actively involved in the decision not to close preschools and compulsory schools during the first wave,” which suggests the Social Democratic national government was firmly behind keeping schools open.

Swedish Coronavirus Commission Report English Summary

In May 2020, the Swedish Public Health Agency’s former general director said that keeping schools open was necessary not only to protect the well-being and health of children, but also to ensure that those “with important jobs for society” could continue working during the public health emergency.

“It is not possible to just close schools without knowing where the children are going — for both social, psychological but also infection prevention reasons,” the Public Health Agency’s general director Johan Carlson said…

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Anthony LaMesa

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